A Good Beer Blog

-------

Have you read The Unbearable Nonsense of Craft Beer - A Rant in Nine Acts by Alan and Max yet? It's out on Kindle as well as Lulu.

Maureen Ogle said this about the book: "... immensely readable, sometimes slightly surreal rumination on beer in general and craft beer in particular. Funny, witty, but most important: Smart. The beer geeks will likely get all cranky about it, but Alan and Max are the masters of cranky..."

Ron Pattinson said: "I'm in a rather odd situation. Because I appear in the book. A fictional version of me. It's a weird feeling."


Comments

Comments are locked. No additional comments may be posted.

Laurel Dempsey -

Well, at least we know where John Soloman Cartwright lived

Steve Gates -

I think you have it right Alan, beer was primarily brewed for local consumption and the only beer leaving the town of Kingston was purchased by the Imperial Forces and sent to where it was decided it was needed and the likely destination at that time was York. The popularity of whiskey vice beer did not seem to wane until about the latter half of the 1840's, I have seen a letter to the editor proclaiming this observation in Kingston dated 1849. All quite interesting for sure.

Alan -

Ooh, where is that letter, Steve. Don't keep all the good stuff for your books! ;-)

Steve Gates -

As you know Alan, I am cryptically fastidious when it comes to operational security [OPSEC] but I am slowly coming around to a more free reign style of information sharing. Please bear with me while I make the transition. It is interesting to see how the old "originals" hung onto the love of whiskey, these fellas were the Col By era former military types that prevailed and thrived during the first three decades of the 1800's but as they died off due to their love of the wee dram the beverage of choice for their successors was definitely beer.

Alan -

We think of advances too often by decade rather than generation. Generations overlap and lives span three of four of them with luck. So we have these recollections. I wish I had more of them and earlier ones, anecdotal recollections of life's pleasures of 1765 from the perspective of 1835.