A Good Beer Blog

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Have you read The Unbearable Nonsense of Craft Beer - A Rant in Nine Acts by Alan and Max yet? It's out on Kindle as well as Lulu.

Maureen Ogle said this about the book: "... immensely readable, sometimes slightly surreal rumination on beer in general and craft beer in particular. Funny, witty, but most important: Smart. The beer geeks will likely get all cranky about it, but Alan and Max are the masters of cranky..."

Ron Pattinson said: "I'm in a rather odd situation. Because I appear in the book. A fictional version of me. It's a weird feeling."


Comments

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Jordan St.john -

Alternately, you could have used straw of a specific length as a hop jack in order to filter out hops and then use them again in a subsequent brew. Horsehair was also used for this.

Alan -

No mention of that function but that certainly could be fourth use.

Alan -

Here is an interesting 1913 article on the poor interaction between chaff cutting and brewing.

Craig -

I wonder if burning the straw imparted any smokiness to the final beer?

Ron Pattinson -

Given that the boxes are mentioned in a section about the kiln, my guess would be that they were using the straw as fuel for the kiln.

Alan -

Craig, wheat straw imparts the least smokiness. Managing the fuel to achieve goals like even heat, low smoke and thorough drying would have been a skill we would now have no clue about now.

Alan -

Plus, they are indirectly kilning from that description. And they need diastatic properties so they are aiming for pale. And if you think about the 1835 records where it says they want pale hops to not impart a green hue due to the high hopping. That would only occur with a beer of a certain lightness of colour.

Alan -

Oh, and they would want to be efficient, using the least fuel for the achieved diastatic effect. Yet, Vassar has porter in 1809... so they would be able to manage the skill on a small scale.