A Good Beer Blog

-------

Have you read The Unbearable Nonsense of Craft Beer - A Rant in Nine Acts by Alan and Max yet? It's out on Kindle as well as Lulu.

Maureen Ogle said this about the book: "... immensely readable, sometimes slightly surreal rumination on beer in general and craft beer in particular. Funny, witty, but most important: Smart. The beer geeks will likely get all cranky about it, but Alan and Max are the masters of cranky..."

Ron Pattinson said: "I'm in a rather odd situation. Because I appear in the book. A fictional version of me. It's a weird feeling."


Comments

Comments are locked. No additional comments may be posted.

Alan -

Yet there are odd assertions in the WAo'B. On page 42 I read:

"Unlike wine, beer offers a world of possibilities when the time comes for dessert..."

Really? Port? Sherry? Tokaji? Madeira? Sweet Champagne? Greek Mavrodaphne? Ice wines, late harvest wines? Sauternes? Muscat de Beaumes-de-Venise? Moscato d'Asti? Banyuls? Trockenbeerenauslese? Monbazillac? All of various grades, makers, vintages? Beer can touch those and their colleagues?

Stephen Beaumont -

That's a specific reference to food pairing, Alan, in which I maintain beer has a wide edge over wine. Port or PX sherry is lovely at the end of a meal, for certain, but hardly boasts the pairing potential of a sweet stout or strong, Belgian-inspired spiced ale.

And apologies that you did not receive a review copy -- you were supposed to. Thank you for taking the initiative and getting one nonetheless.

Alan -

Not only did I buy one, I will be giving it for Christmas. I think you have hit a very sweet spot between newbie and fan. Imagine being the one who created a bridge over that gap.

"Hardly"? I can only deny that. I would be quite willing to represent wine on a dessert-off against you and your shadowy forces of "pairing" - but not to show it is better but that each has a proper, equal and complex place. My pet theory is that people are scared of all sweets and an inarticulate in relation to its intricacies. Sweet beer suffers the same fate.