A Good Beer Blog

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Have you read The Unbearable Nonsense of Craft Beer - A Rant in Nine Acts by Alan and Max yet? It's out on Kindle as well as Lulu.

Maureen Ogle said this about the book: "... immensely readable, sometimes slightly surreal rumination on beer in general and craft beer in particular. Funny, witty, but most important: Smart. The beer geeks will likely get all cranky about it, but Alan and Max are the masters of cranky..."

Ron Pattinson said: "I'm in a rather odd situation. Because I appear in the book. A fictional version of me. It's a weird feeling."


Comments

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Emily -

How very cool! Have you heard of the The Night Train to Detroit (http://nighttraintodetroit.com)? Amy is a historical blogger about the city and its connections to everything in the region (so Canada obviously plays a heavy role!) and she's just started this series called Drunk History Night - a night about all things historical, Detroit, and drinking. The photos and stories she finds are always incredibly interesting. I thought you might like to check it out!

Ed Carson -

Two things: 1) I was going to comment on the use of a United State's money and remembered Toronto's old name was York, so never mind; and B] Almost 2 shillings for a growler? Were buckets or bottles that rare?

Alan -

You were right the first time, Ed. That would have been NY state currency they were looking for. At that time, Toronto would have imported much of its material goods from here in Kingston at the east end of the Lake or more likely the nearer US south shore of the lake. I was interested in the reference to "best strong beer". Fits in with my Albany ale theory.

Alan -

In 1808 there was no standard Upper Canadian currency. It had only existed as a separate entity since 1791. If you look at this 1801 letter from the Anglican priest here in Kingston to his boss, the Bishop of Nova Scotia (1,000 miles to the east), you will see some sense of how dependent early Toronto was economically. New York also had a pound.

Ed Carson -

But this advertisement dates from twenty-five years after such money had been exchanged for US dollars(1 US=1000 continentals; 1 continental= 8 New York shillings. Yes, the money was pretty much worthless.)

Alan -

I think on both sides of the border before the 1820s and 1830s there may have simply been a lack of cash. Contract and debt based dealing, as the ad wishes to avoid, allowed for later settlement as opposed to how cash works. So if he is going after coins, the NY ones were likely the most useful to him. Must have been a very different world.

Gary Gillman -

Nice photo: many buildings on the west side of Toronto still look like that.

Gary

Alan -

"Many"? But there wouldn't be wooden 200 year old ones, would there? The Horseshoe is 53 years younger. There does seem to be one private house left from the era.

Gary Gillman -

But many just look like that, I didn't mean they were built at the same time, but building styles endure for a few generations sometimes. Queen Street West and some of the side streets offers numerous examples and north of it and also around Davenport going west from Bathurst. It just looks very familiar, except for the white colour. Horseshoe probably originally looked very similar but there's been some renovation over the years I think, especially the cladding.

Gary

Alan -

Well that is quite right. I am lumbered for working in the heritage law world sometimes. Have a look at Kingston's Queen's Inn from 1839 and you see a beefier version of the same thing in Limestone.

Gary Gillman -

Indeed. Many fine old buildings in Kingston.

Gary

Ed Carson -

Speaking of Albany ale: Food, Drink and Celebrations of the Hudson Valley Dutch by Peter G.Rose esp. pgs. 42 and 43 The Kingston mentioned is 90 miles south of Albany was known as Esopus or Bevierwyck pre-British.