A Good Beer Blog

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Have you read The Unbearable Nonsense of Craft Beer - A Rant in Nine Acts by Alan and Max yet? It's out on Kindle as well as Lulu.

Maureen Ogle said this about the book: "... immensely readable, sometimes slightly surreal rumination on beer in general and craft beer in particular. Funny, witty, but most important: Smart. The beer geeks will likely get all cranky about it, but Alan and Max are the masters of cranky..."

Ron Pattinson said: "I'm in a rather odd situation. Because I appear in the book. A fictional version of me. It's a weird feeling."


Comments

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dansmallbeer -

I wonder if anyone ever had a go of creating a good snakebite or black-velvet using quality beer and cider, champagne, etc. Would Old Rasputin+Dom Perignon still be essentially shite? Here's my only effort at a beer cocktail: http://smallbeerblog.blogspot.com/2011/04/is-this-wrong.html

Craig -

The Cottage (The Mirror Lake Inn's Pub) in Lake Placid uses Clamato in their Bloody Mary's—and they're bloody damn good.

Alan -

Clamato in a Bloody Mary is called a Caesar up here. Once I had one where the bar used tomato juice and the liquid from a can of clams. Not so good.

Russ Tarvin -

My wife is Mexican and she introduced me to the Red Beer. Now it is different down here, but what we usually do is a Mexican-ish beer like Dos Equis or Sol and we do half a lime squeezed, Clamato, and the amount is different every time, some mexican spices (which you can substitute Tapatio and Worcestershire sauce) and beer and ice and you are good.
We love them down here in San Diego. Our local market has the cups already made with spices, you just need the lime, Clamato and beer.

Alan -

Now, while it's not quite the old Nova Scotian home's style, it sure does look tasty. I hadn't thought of the lime even though the other '80s beer cocktail there was lime and lager.

Gary Gillman -

A Black Velvet properly made is one of the great beer cocktails. I just made one with Veuve Cliquot and Guinness FES (Alan, you should be able to pick this up in your northern NY soujourns, it is a superb iteration of Guinness). You can use any decent sparkling wine, however too rich a stout and sparkler may be too much of a good thing, the drink should be refreshing too. I'd use any stout up to about 7% ABV that isn't too heavy (the FES is rich enough certainly) and and good sparkling wine again.

A Red Eye seems a regional North American drink - in many ways a kind of fruited beer since tomato is a fruit and sweetish when fresh. Our version of those European mixtures where fruits were added to various beers to form cups (in England) or punches in Germany and so forth, and perhaps too originally (who knows( the tomato was allowed to ferment in unfiltered beers at breweries a la kriek style - anyway there is a connection. I never saw it in Quebec, I firt encountered it in Winnipeg in the early 70's. As you implied Alan, it had a reputation as a mender of sensitive dispositions after a late night out.

Gary

Gary Gillman -

Sorry Alan, haven't had my coffee yet: My last paragraph corrected:

"A Red Eye seems a regional North American drink - in many ways a kind of fruited beer since tomato is a fruit and sweetish when fresh. It's our original version of those European mixtures where fruits were added to various beers to form cups (in England) or punches in Germany and so forth, and perhaps too originally (who knows) the tomato was allowed to ferment in unfiltered beers at breweries a la kriek style - anyway there is a connection. I never saw it in Quebec, I first encountered it in Winnipeg in the early 70's. As you implied Alan, it had a reputation as a mender of sensitive dispositions after a late night out".

I'd like to add that with canned juices it's okay but made with fresh-pressed tomato juice from field tomatoes it is superb. I'd think this is how the drink was originally made.

Gary

Alan -

Gerry wasn't squeezing no tomatoes.

So, if it wasn't in Quebec and I don't think I have heard of an Ontario version, I wonder if the Midtown was just selling the western drink or if it was an independent discovery. It was not in, for example, the LBR, Lower Deck or the Seahorse in early 1980s before they got trendy. There men salted their draught.

Gary Gillman -

Yup, the salt thing was in Quebec Province too, this all in the past, associated with the old-style (male only) tavern of which none survive I believe. There is a certain "brasserie" with similar tables and chairs that you can find, sometimes with the gambling machines along the side, and the same circular tables and solid wood chairs. Even though male-dominated, they don't seem the same somehow. Heck, you can't get the 22 ounce "quarts" anymore, they give you a bottle that is even bigger than that, too big and round, don't like it. The salt shakers at any rate seem reserved for food now.

I think the tomato thing was just one of those regional tastes that are hard to explicate, did tomatoes grow better in hot Manitoba summers, and down from Halifax in their summers than around Montreal and Toronto? I doubt it. Just one of those inexplicable things.

Gary

Greg -

Heinz tomato, there is no other kindz has the red white and black can. I've had Red Eyes at the Midtown in years gone by and last Saturday morning at the fishing camp. I have tried many different beers in the mix, the best I've found are Rickard's Red and Clancy's Amber. It's good for what ails you.