A Good Beer Blog

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Have you read The Unbearable Nonsense of Craft Beer - A Rant in Nine Acts by Alan and Max yet? It's out on Kindle as well as Lulu.

Maureen Ogle said this about the book: "... immensely readable, sometimes slightly surreal rumination on beer in general and craft beer in particular. Funny, witty, but most important: Smart. The beer geeks will likely get all cranky about it, but Alan and Max are the masters of cranky..."

Ron Pattinson said: "I'm in a rather odd situation. Because I appear in the book. A fictional version of me. It's a weird feeling."


Comments

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Gary Gillman -

Alan, very interesting. Was there any insight on the qualities and types of beer available in the period covered?

Gary

Alan -

Not all that much reference to beer in fact. I suspect that it was either so pervasive and even made at home as to be not comment worthy or, in fact, as with the same early decades of the US hard liquor was more the thing. No reference, for example, to casks and cellar men.

Gary Gillman -

Okay thanks. Salutary point about the settlement of the Loyalist Highway area and many other areas in Canada by incoming Americans dissatisfied with the American Revolution or uprooted in some way by it. (It has been theorized that they brought rye whisky to Canada too - rye whisky is a cousin to bourbon - but that is a different story). Canada's character seems often, in the view of many who live here, to be one that differs in many respects from that of our southern neighbour. Yet the corpus of the Canadian population was for a long time, and perhaps is still in terms of long-term cultural and social traits, American-derived. True, the Americans who came here left the U.S.A at an early date but still, they were Americans whose families in many cases had lived in America for many generations. I always felt Canadians and Americans share more in common than is often realized, and this historical apercu may suggest why, in part anyway.

Gary

Gary

Robert Young -

Hello looks like an interesting book. I'm trying to find info on Roth brothers brewery in Listowel,Ontario.My mom was a Roth directly related to Valentine Roth who started the company.Would love to find the names and types of beer they produced,especially keen to try to locate some old bottles if they exist?Any suggestions where I might start to research?Best regards Robert Young

Steve Gates -

Robert, Henry Kuntz, the son of David Kuntz, who established breweries in Hamilton and Guelph, partnered with Robert Roth and formed the Listowell Brewery. Roth and Kuntz purchased the former Steinberg Brewery in 1877. When Robert's brother came over from Germany a year later, Kuntz sold his share of the brewery to Joseph Roth and returned to Hamilton. The Roth Brothers brewed continually until Robert died in 1894. Joseph Roth did leave for Preston for a short while but he returned. After Robert's death, his widow Edna operated with Joseph until 1897 then they sold to Samuel Davidson. The Listowel brewery operated until 1919 when prohibition forced it's closure. I have not seen an embossed bottle but perhaps a labeled bottle did exist, early advertisements do mention that the beer is available in both wood and glass. An artifact from that brewery would be very rare, do you have any paper(letters, envelopes etc) from the Roths? Take care and be proud of your early Ontario brewing heritage. Steve.

Alan -

Listowell had a brewery? I wonder who were the customers between the dour Scots and the old school Mennonites.