A Good Beer Blog

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Have you read The Unbearable Nonsense of Craft Beer - A Rant in Nine Acts by Alan and Max yet? It's out on Kindle as well as Lulu.

Maureen Ogle said this about the book: "... immensely readable, sometimes slightly surreal rumination on beer in general and craft beer in particular. Funny, witty, but most important: Smart. The beer geeks will likely get all cranky about it, but Alan and Max are the masters of cranky..."

Ron Pattinson said: "I'm in a rather odd situation. Because I appear in the book. A fictional version of me. It's a weird feeling."


Comments

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Alan -

Ron's taste of KK was not horrid at all.

Craig -

Wait a minute... We haven't proved Boyd used the mineral water!

Alan -

I know. I am just winding people up. Like a back county carny. Freak beers of the 1830s! Come one come all. ;-)

But we do have good evidence that they were loading salt into the brewing water in mad proportions. The association with beer and medicinal salts as a nourishing tonic. Look at that 1906 label over at the Facebook group: flesh building!

Alan -

So the question still is - did the CNY public in the 1800 to 1850 era have a taste for salt because they associate it with health? How saline was it?

Lisa -

I'm all for more of that sort of thing - loved both bottles of Ron Pattinson's beers I've had so far (and as an ex-archivist & archaeologist, I love that people are taking the time to go to primary sources and chemical analysis a la Dogfish Head/Penn Museum to actually figure these things out).

dave -

My problem with the brewer's quote is "modern tastes"... whose "modern tastes" are we talking about? I don't know if I have "modern taste" but I have the ability to taste and the Pretty Things KK on cask was great (wasn't at the unveiling but it was still on cask yesterday), and I can't wait to pick up a few bottles of it, but would it be good to someone with "modern taste"? Not sure.

Then again I also find the whole "historic beer" style (its not a style, but I'm lacking the proper word) quite interesting.

Alan -

I think the word is "extravaganza!" as in historic beer extravaganza! Give it a bit of the old Barnum and Bailey. I am sure it should also be italicized but no one is going to buy that.

People should also shout "huzzah" when these casks are first tapped.

Craig -

Come one, come all to the amazing show.... just one moment to add as a fan on facebook... Step right up, yessiree... See death defying thumbs-up "LIKES"... Heart stopping maps and images.... For children of all ages (above the age of 21)

Craig -

Alan, I think you would agree that the Albany Ale Project is "The Greatest Show on Earth."

There's no copyright, issue on that is there?

Alan -

It is interesting unravelling cultural differences between 1770, 1800, 1830 and 1870 to know whether "huzzah" or the Barnum and Bailey approach would work. I've recently read a book on taverns in 1790s to 1850s Upper Canada (now Ontario) and just finished another on colonial taverns in what become the United States. The distinct nature of each colony / province in each generation is pretty neat. As may be their tastes in beer.

Alan -

I thought that was the Mets, Craig.

Craig -

Yes, but apparently the ringleader's services are no longer need, so they let him go.

Bob -

A little off the topic as far as this comment thread, but have you had a chance to try any beers from Haandbryggeriet, Alan?

One importer is now bringing small amounts of these into Australia at present and so far I've found them very interesting - recreations of old-timey Norwegian styles such as a smoked beer with juniper berries, a stout-like herbed beer of the old Gravøl style (apparently), brewed for funerals, and Hesjeøl, a harvest ale made with barley, oats and rye but no 'malt' per se. None of them taste familiar to me.

Alan -

Hey Bob. I had Norwegian Wood a year and a half ago. My problem is when I see these beers for sale in the states they are so much more expensive than US craft beer. Is that the same there?

Bob -

The folks that bring them over are Beermasons, kind of a beer of the month club type thing, so they're mostly included in a pack with a bunch of other beers, although you can buy a case of 12 of any one of them, which works out cheap considering almost any imports to Australia are heavily taxed. Not sure if I'd want a dozen of any of the ones I've tried so far, but I'm glad to be able to try them.