A Good Beer Blog

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Have you read The Unbearable Nonsense of Craft Beer - A Rant in Nine Acts by Alan and Max yet? It's out on Kindle as well as Lulu.

Maureen Ogle said this about the book: "... immensely readable, sometimes slightly surreal rumination on beer in general and craft beer in particular. Funny, witty, but most important: Smart. The beer geeks will likely get all cranky about it, but Alan and Max are the masters of cranky..."

Ron Pattinson said: "I'm in a rather odd situation. Because I appear in the book. A fictional version of me. It's a weird feeling."


Comments

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Knut -

What section of your bookshelf have you put the beers in? Tarts with Tops On?

Alan -

Sports and pies.

Paul -

Northeast? I thought Red Hook was in Washington state...is their Winterhook made in the northeast?

beerinator -

Redhook is in Washington State. But they're also in New Hampshire.

Here's info about their New Hampshire Brewery;
http://www.redhook.com/happs_cataqua1.htm.

Alan -

Good question. Sometimes it is hard to figure out which location the brews come from when you have these bi-regional regional macro-minis.

Lars Marius Garshol -

I'd say there is a difference between a dunkel weizen and a weizenbock, in that the dunkel may well have only roasted malts to separate it from the hefeweizen, whereas the weizenbock should be heavier, sweeter, more complex, and probably have more alcohol as well.

Alan -

Ahh, so a dunekweizen is a beefed up hefe with that strain of yeast while a weizen bock is a bock of wheat with an entirely different yeast. In fact the first is an ale and the second a lager. Couldn't be more different.

Alan -

But I think I am still confused as Michael Jackson calls Aventinus a <i>weizenbock</i> in his <i>Great Beer Guide</i>. The glass in the photo says <i>weizenstarkbier</i>.