A Good Beer Blog

-------

Have you read The Unbearable Nonsense of Craft Beer - A Rant in Nine Acts by Alan and Max yet? It's out on Kindle as well as Lulu.

Maureen Ogle said this about the book: "... immensely readable, sometimes slightly surreal rumination on beer in general and craft beer in particular. Funny, witty, but most important: Smart. The beer geeks will likely get all cranky about it, but Alan and Max are the masters of cranky..."

Ron Pattinson said: "I'm in a rather odd situation. Because I appear in the book. A fictional version of me. It's a weird feeling."


Comments

Comments are locked. No additional comments may be posted.

KevBrews -

A note about the Brooklyn Chocolate stout 2% increase--I attended a tasting a few months back where Garrett Oliver was the guest host. He explained that the beer isn't actually any stronger than before--it's just that they recently did a second analysis on it and realized that they had miscalculated the ABV on the original versions.

Alan -

What a cheater pants! If anything I would have thought this year's was in error as it in no way came across as a +10% beer.

Matthew -

"Baltic... is a quibble with English made stout for the Russian export trade."

I don't follow you. A Baltic porter is a lager, while an English stout (or porter) would presumably be an ale (like all other variants of stout or porter I can think of).

Is there even such thing as a Baltic <i>stout</i>? Your link on the topic goes to a post on a Baltic <i>porter</i> (and a terrific one!). The previous post also calls it an "artifact of a style." I don't agree. The beers I think of as typical Baltic porters are clearly distinctive in their own right, mainly from being lagers, and from an unusually bitter "burnt" (for lack of a better term) malt character. I am not sure offhand if Sinebrychoff is a lager or an ale, but I am thinking of Okocim, Zywiec, and others that are certainly lagers. I once saw a discussion on alt.beer that claimed Baltic porter was just a sub-claass of bock. Now that makes slightly more sense than saying it's a variant of an English porter, but I still would not buy that argument.

Great photo, by the way. And I can hardly imagine a raspberry imperial stout, but from your description, I would love to try it.

Alan -

Just to be clear - I do not really know much about this stuff but the Baltic trade in these beers from England I though was 18th century, so more porter era than stout. And it certainly predates lagering. So more of an ale historically. But you are right that these are now lagered but that licorice thing is a big throw back to the pre-lager world. I think of it (when I think about these things) as a hybrid, like the western NY cream ales - basically a bit of this and a bit of that.<p>But you likely really caught me not thinking that point of yours through. I do not agree that it is a move to bock - unless the style is in entire deterioration. Most likely, we are trying to foist the labels of styles we are familiar with. Does anyone argue about the derivation of Mocne, that Polish strong musty lager/ale style? What about Jasne? My point is not to be clever but to point out I might be showing myself to be ramming a square eastern European block into a round English hole.

Matthew -

Alan, fair point about the origins of the style. And, yes, I do think today's Baltic porters--the lager version--is a distinct style (and not a subtype of bock unless any strong lager is by definition a bock).

I don't think I have ever had Mocne or Jasne.

Alan -

When I lived in Poland in 1991 I had some of the best beer I ever had - as well as some of the worst, including a one hopped with clove. Jasne on a label generally meant light beer as I recalled but that was stronger than our light.

Alan -

With two out of ten to go, this post is becoming an epic.

Harmy G -

It's actually "A. Le Coq," not "Le Coq."
http://www.alecoq.ee/

Alan -

Wow - you may have just won the priggery award.

Harmy G -

If it was any other letter than "A" you would not have omitted it, yes?

Alan -

??? Oh - are you suggesting a prudishness based on the double entendre.

No.

Harmy G -

No, I'm asking why you didn't list the beer in the full name. Not sure why the correction garners the priggery award. I look at the post and you still have not corrected it for some reason.

Alan -

Please go away. You can fix it on your own website and gaze at it with admiration. If you look back here in a month or a year it will look as it does today as a reminder to us all of the vacuousness of such priggery. And get after the BAers while you are at it. Why waste all your efforts on me when you can waste them on other websites as well.